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Copyright

Every piece on this site is copyright by me, Michael Quinion.

You must ask me before you reproduce any piece on this site on another website or in a blog. Before you ask, I should say that I’m not usually agreeable to having a piece reproduced in its entirety elsewhere online — it means that I lose control of it, in particular the ability to correct or update it.

The copyright symbol

You also need to ask permission, of course, if you wish to reproduce a piece in a newspaper, magazine, book, or other print publication. In such cases I usually request a fee.

You do not need to ask permission if you are a teacher who wants to use pieces for educational purposes. However, it would be good to hear about your proposed use.

You’re more than welcome, of course, to refer to pieces, comment on them or criticise them, so long as you don’t quote more than a small part of them. You may also copy and store copies of pieces for your private use or for schoolwork or for research purposes. All this is permitted under the usual copyright fair use provisions.

If you do refer to a piece, it’s a courtesy to your readers and to me to say who wrote it and where you got it from. Please include a link either to the original piece or to this site’s home page.

You don’t need to ask me first if you propose to provide only a link on your own site to this one or to a piece contained in it (their locations are permanent and you may safely quote the URI of an individual item). I’ll be delighted if you do. Tell your friends as well!

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Copyright © Michael Quinion, 1996–. All rights reserved.
Last updated 18 Oct. 2014.

Advice on copyright

The English language is forever changing. New words appear; old ones fall out of use or alter their meanings. World Wide Words tries to record at least a part of this shifting wordscape by featuring new words, word histories, words in the news, and the curiosities of native English speech.

World Wide Words is copyright © Michael Quinion, 1996– All rights reserved.
This page URL: http://www.worldwidewords.org/index.htm
Last modified: 18 Oct. 2014.